Camping 2017

It feels like a century since we put our 1974 Dodge Travco “Lucky Seven” into winter storage. We’ve thought about and planned for the 2017 camping season virtually since we put the RV away for the cold months.

Today, Lucky Seven arises from her hibernation. In  few short hours we will be pulling her into our driveway and hooking her up to hydro and water, checking everything over and preparing for this summer’s adventures.

Day Tripping

The first several weeks we will  limit ourselves to short day-trips. We have an annual day pass for Ontario’s provincial parks, and I believe one of the best parks in the province is less than a half hour’s drive from our house: Sandbanks Provincial Park has kilometres of sand beaches and trails to hike and enjoy on the shores of Lake Ontario.

We’ll be packing a picnic lunch or bringing along BBQ treats, and while my husband is walking the dog I’ll be collecting driftwood for my new venture Catch My Drift? my one of a kind driftwood art creations.

Gotta go get the Travco now. Going on an adventure soon!Craft shows image3

One of my art pieces 🙂

 

Advertisements

Talent and Creativity

I’ve discovered one thing since acquiring our 1975 Travco. There are a lot of talented, creative people restoring vintage trailers and RVs.

A plethora of how-to videos and photos exist online attesting to the many abilities brought to the table when restoring an RV or trailer. Some people focus on the mechanical side, rebuilding engines, welding chassis’, and upgrading wiring and lights. Others focus on the décor, matching fabrics, window treatments, paint schemes and patterns.

The best thing about being online is all these talented people available to answer my questions. They do this frequently because I have lots of them. I’ve gotten accurate, useful information on my Travco’s brake system, engine, alternative heating solutions, tires and decorating styles to name a few.

Human nature dictates we want to be part of a community. The vintage RV community is one of the most generous and welcoming groups I’ve been in contact with. Our Travco isn’t drivable yet, but we’ve been invited to RV shows, swap meets and other events. Several Travco owners have extended invitations to drop by if we are passing through. We hope to do this in the years to come.

I’ll leave you with a few photos showcasing some of the incredible things these restorers have created. I hope I can measure up to their ability and have a showpiece of our own in 2016.

I’ve discovered one thing since acquiring our 1975 Travco. There are a lot of talented, creative people restoring vintage trailers and RVs.

A plethora of how-to videos and photos exist online attesting to the many abilities brought to the table when restoring an RV or trailer. Some people focus on the mechanical side, rebuilding engines, welding chassis’, and upgrading wiring and lights. Others focus on the décor, matching fabrics, window treatments, paint schemes and patterns.

The best thing about being online is all these talented people available to answer my questions. They do this frequently because I have lots of them. I’ve gotten accurate, useful information on my Travco’s brake system, engine, alternative heating solutions, tires and decorating styles to name a few.

Human nature dictates we want to be part of a community. The vintage RV community is one of the most generous and welcoming groups I’ve been in contact with. Our Travco isn’t drivable yet, but we’ve been invited to RV shows, swap meets and other events. Several Travco owners have extended invitations to drop by if we are passing through. We hope to do this in the years to come.

I’ll leave you with a few photos showcasing some of handy links for creative restorers. With all this information we should have a showpiece of our own in 2016.

1976 colors1970s Color schemes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bay blanket RV

 

44 Cheap and easy ways to organize your RV

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pop rivets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to hang almost anything in your RV

 

First try at knit curtains

I’ve never been able to knit or crochet. The women in my family tried over the years, but I just couldn’t get working with hook or needles. That’s changed now.

I recently discovered knitting with the Knifty Knitter loom. Projects work up fairly quickly. I haven’t experimented with fancy stitches, but what I have learned works well for RV curtains.

The original orange curtains on our 1979 Travco were sun-rotted and tattered from 40 years of use. Every RV renovation I’ve seen has shown creative curtain ideas – prints, ruffles, lace trim and more – but I hadn’t seen any knit curtains.

The first set was for the front window surround. They were fairly easy as they attached to the rails with standard curtain hooks. The second set I tackled was for the back window. They were tricky as the originals snapped onto a top and bottom rail.

The best solution I came up with was to repurpose the original snaps into the new knitted curtains. I clipped them out of the old curtains and with lots of clothespins and fabric glue, I managed to attach them to the knitting.

The project came out satisfactorily. The first curtain came up a couple inches short, as I did not figure in enough extra length where the snap-tape was pleated. I’m adding an extra four inches to the second curtain to compensate for this. Hopefully the faux pas won’t show much.

I worked this pattern in two Lion Brand Wool-Ease Thick & Quick colors – Sequoia and Hudson Bay.

I’ll take you through the steps in photographs:

Start of the project before any gluing. The knit curtain, strip of snaps and clothespins.
Start of the project before any gluing. The knit curtain, strip of snaps and clothespins.
Partially finished. Gluing the snaps to the curtain top. Clamping with clothespins.
Partially finished. Gluing the snaps to the curtain top. Clamping with clothespins.
Project all glued and clamped. Left it to dry overnight.
Project all glued and clamped. Left it to dry overnight.
All finished! Can't wait to put them up until next spring
All finished! Can’t wait to put them up until next spring
My one big error. Didn't measure correctly and came up short. Hope to come up with some simple way to correct this.
My one big error. Didn’t measure correctly and came up short. Hope to come up with some simple way to correct this.